EWB-USA’s Engineering Service Corps program draws on the expertise of our most seasoned volunteers  from across engineering disciplines and industry sectors. We respond to requests for engineering project support from governments, international NGOs, United Nations agencies, local communities and other institutions who lack access to the necessary technical resources to address the engineering challenges facing some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.

Projects vary greatly in scale and duration, with focus areas of expertise in disaster response,  infrastructure, agriculture, energy and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Our volunteers work as part of an integral team that performs a variety of services, including engineering studies, owner’s representation, planning, design, project management, training, and monitoring and evaluation.

Volunteer Opportunities

The Engineering Service Corps is comprised of volunteers with several years of both professional and international experience. Engineering Service Corps assignments range from several weeks overseas to a home-based design review that requires no travel at all. Responses to project requests are crafted on a case-by-case basis and depend entirely upon the project needs and role required of the volunteer.

View open opportunities >>

Apply to join our standing roster by telling us more about your volunteer experience and interests >>

How to Request Engineering Services

If you require senior-level engineering project support for your organization, the first step is to review the criteria in the Engineering Service Corps’ Request for Project Support form.

Review and complete the Request for Project Support form >>

Program Areas of Expertise

By harnessing the skills of our most experienced volunteers, the Engineering Service Corps is equipped to deliver creative, lasting solutions for a myriad of global challenges.

Disaster Response
The Engineering Service Corps responds to disasters by providing engineering expertise to host-country NGOs and governments. Services provided include: building inspection, demolition assessment, geologic risk assessments and refugee camp infrastructure studies. Past projects include: post-earthquake structural assessments and the provision of guidance on safe demolition and rebuilding practices in Nepal and Ecuador.

Agriculture
The Engineering Service Corps implemented a USAID Farmer-to-Farmer Program in Kosovo, to address the country’s lack of proper post-harvest facilities and processing technologies. Engineering Service Corps volunteers provided engineering support to agribusinesses and farmers across the country to evaluate, design and improve the process to bring agriculture products to the commercial market throughout Europe.

 

Infrastructure
Infrastructure services provided by Engineering Service Corps volunteers include: feasibility studies, structural design, design reviews and construction oversight as the owner’s representative. Past projects include: improving hospital systems in an Ebola-affected area of Sierra Leone and a feasibility study on a $2.5m wastewater system for a refugee camp in the West Bank.

 

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene
The Engineering Service Corps excels at providing services for the WASH sector. Past projects include: installation of a sand filtration system in Joyabaj, Guatemala, serving more than 25,000 beneficiaries and the repair of 35 wells that brought water to more than 100,000 people in drought-stricken Ethiopia.

 

Energy
Tackling energy-related challenges has become a core offering of services provided by the Engineering Service Corps. Our volunteer experts understand the inherited social and technical issues to designing and implementing locally appropriate technologies. Past projects include: the design and construction of a solar micro-grid at a UNHCR refugee camp in Nepal that gave 22,000 Bhutanese refugees light and a study to rehabilitate a retired hydroelectric system in Guatemala to reduce the power generation cost and utilize renewable energy to address climate change concerns.