Unlock Your Career Without Limits: Professional Engineering and Surveying Licensure

Professional licensure is more than proof of your skills or a requirement for a job. It’s a stamp in your book that states you are trusted and uniquely qualified to tackle any engineering or surveying challenge in your domain. It affords you the opportunity to work on fulfilling, exciting, impactful and innovative projects. Professional licensure unlocks your career without limits.

In the United States, licensure for the engineering and surveying professions is regulated by each state. If you are interested in pursuing licensure you are encouraged to check the requirements in the state or territory where you plan to practice, as the requirements vary.

Steps to Becoming a PE

While each state licensing board has its own laws regarding engineering licensure, there is a general three-step process for licensure candidates:

Education

Generally, engineering licensing boards require PE candidates to have an EAC/ABET-accredited bachelor’s degree. Check the requirements of your state licensing board. Each state licensing board has varying educational requirements.

Exams

Licensure candidates typically must pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam and the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE) exam.

Experience

Most states require four years of acceptable, progressive, and verifiable work experience in the industry.

Steps to Becoming a PS

While each state licensing board has its own laws regarding surveying licensure, there is a general three-step process for licensure candidates:

Education

Complete the appropriate level of education in your state. Check the requirements of your state licensing board. Some require only a high school diploma, while many others require a degree from an accredited four-year surveying program.

Exams

Licensure candidates typically must pass the Fundamentals of Surveying (FS) exam, the Principles and Practice of Surveying (PS) exam, and a state-specific exam.

Experience

Most states require four years of acceptable, progressive, and verifiable work experience under the supervision of a licensed surveyor.

 


 

 Licensure information brought to you by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES), a proud partner of EWB-USA.

NCEES